Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

 

Stefania Druga

Innately curious and passionate about creating and testing new learning models, instructional designer by training, evolved into a learning architect and is currently a graduate student at MIT Media Lab Lifelong Kindergarten group. She is also a former Googler and graduated from an international Erasmus Mundus master of Media Engineering for Education (France, Spain, Portugal). In the summer of 2012 she was also the Education Teaching Fellow at Singularity University where she advised and coached 80 students from 36 countries. Currently she is leading Hackidemia organization (mobile lab for maker Education present in 40 countries), Afrimakers (community of Maker projects in 10 African countries) and MakerCamp (global camps for learning how to build and run makerspaces) Stefania is also an an ambassador for global MakerFaire in Berlin and Shenzhen, collaborator for digital fabrication with Samsung Research.

 

 

Andrew Marcinek

Andrew Marcinek is currently the Chief Open Education Advisor for the US Department of Education. In this role, Andrew has focused his work on supporting PK-12 school districts and state leaders connect with teaching, learning and research resources in the public domain that are openly licensed. Previously, Andrew served as the Director of Technology for Grafton Public Schools and a blogger for Edutopia. He previously served as an Instructional Technology Specialist for Burlington High School and helped lead the 1:1 iPad learning program as well as the creation of the Student Help Desk program. Andrew has designed and created a digital and information literacy course that focuses on Web 2.0 applications, Google Apps for Education, Information Literacy, and Digital Citizenship. Outside the classroom, Andrew has organized four edcamps and presented at various conferences around the country. Based on his current and previous work, Andrew published his first book, The 1:1 Roadmap (Corwin, 2014).
 
 
 
 

Dr. Richard Stallman

Dr. Richard Stallman launched the free software movement in 1983 and started the development of the GNU operating system (see www.gnu.org) in 1984.  GNU is free software: everyone has the freedom to copy it and redistribute it, with or without changes.  The GNU/Linux system, basically the GNU operating system with Linux added, is used on tens of millions of computers today.  Stallman has received the ACM Grace Hopper Award and the ACM Software and Systems Award, a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Pioneer Award, and the the Takeda Award for Social/Economic Betterment, as well as several doctorates honoris causa, and has been inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame.
Conference: 
Libre Learn Lab